Second Quarter | 2016

The second quarter of 2016 was dominated by the buildup and final tally of the referendum vote heard across the world—Brexit. On June 23rd, the United Kingdom surprised many by voting to leave the European Union, with the ‘Leave’ camp securing 51.9% of the vote versus 48.1% for ‘Remain’.

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First Quarter | 2016

Global economic weakness and deflationary forces were still at work in the first quarter of 2016. Volatility and uncertainty remained stubborn themes, with markets reacting to major central bank decisions and potential oil supply resolutions.

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Fourth Quarter | 2015

2015 was another busy year at the firm as we continued to add depth to our investment, client and operating teams, while changing some of our core service providers to those with more global reach. We have grown to 122 employees across our Calgary, Toronto and Singapore offices, increased the number of owners from 37 to 44, and are now managing over $30 billion for a wide range of institutional and individual clients.

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Third Quarter | 2015

Volatility increased across asset classes in the third quarter of 2015. China’s economy, weak global commodity prices, and anxiety around if, and when, the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates weighed on investors’ minds. This anxious sentiment was matched by weak, global investment returns across equity markets.

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Second Quarter | 2015

Central bank action was a dominant theme this quarter. While the ECB and Bank of Japan maintained their massive stimulus programs, the Federal Reserve, bolstered by mostly positive economic data, continued to signal for an interest rate hike sometime this year. If, when and by how much rates may rise, continued to be key questions on investors’ minds.

First Quarter | 2015

The threat of slowing growth and deflation were the predominant themes during the first three months of 2015. Based on mounting evidence, central bankers around the world intervened by lowering interest rates and enacting other quantitative easing measures or stimulus plans. Notable participants included Canada, the ECB, China, Japan, India and Australia. The impact of lower energy prices was cited by several central banks as having the potential to reduce inflation and act as a deflationary force.

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